Author Archives: Miguel Nicolelis LAB

Grand Challenge Scholar and Nicolelis Lab undergraduate student, Kevin Mauro, interviewed for White House Office of Science and Technology’s Brain Initiative blog.

Duke University Pratt School of Engineering student Kevin Mauro was recently selected for an interview on the Office of Science and Technology’s blog site, to not only promote the NAE’s Grand Challenge Scholar program but also the President’s BRAIN Initiative. … Continue reading

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Primate Study Confirms Efficacy of Electrical Stimulation of the Spinal Cord as Potential Therapy for Alleviating Parkinson’s Motor Deficits: Treatment Could be Simple, with Long-Term Efficacy

A study in monkeys, carried out at the Primate Center of the Edmond and Lily Safra International Institute of Neuroscience of Natal, a Brazilian research institute, has demonstrated that   electrical stimulation of the spinal cord can relieve a broad range … Continue reading

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News from The Walk Again Project

June 12, 2014 Sao Paulo, Brazil – Walk Again Project Demonstration is Carried out Successfully.  The Walk Again Project took its first big step today during the opening ceremony of the World Cup: in Corinthians Arena, alongside Miguel Nicolelis, members of the research team and the other seven patients who participated in the clinical trials, Juliano Pinto, a 29-year with complete paraplegia of the lower trunk and lower limbs, gave the symbolic kickoff at the World Cup, wearing an exoskeleton controlled by his mind. Continue reading

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The Director of NIH, Dr. Frances Collins, visits Dr. Miguel Nicolelis at Sao Paulo lab where research is being completed for the Walk Again Project demonstration.

SÃO PAULO – Em sua primeira visita ao Brasil, o homem mais poderoso da saúde mundial, o americano Francis Collins, foi ver de perto ontem — e achou “incrível” — o exoesqueleto que fará com que um jovem paraplégico brasileiro … Continue reading

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Prototype neuroprosthetic enables wireless recording of 2,000 neurons across multiple cortical areas

This manuscript describes a novel approach that integrates state-of-the-art microelectrode cubes that can record, for the first time in the literature, from volumes of cortical tissue, a large scale wireless transmission system for over-the-air transmission of these signals, and the … Continue reading

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Long-Term Spinal Cord Stimulation Stalls Parkinson’s Symptoms

Researchers at Duke Medicine have shown that continuing spinal cord stimulation appears to produce improvements in symptoms of Parkinson’s disease, and may protect critical neurons from injury or deterioration. The study, performed in rats, is published online Jan. 23, 2014 … Continue reading

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Monkeys Use Minds to Move Two Virtual Arms

In a study led by the Nicolelis Lab, monkeys have learned to control the movement of both arms on an avatar using just their brain activity. The findings, published on Nov. 6, 2013, in the journal Science Translational Medicine, advance efforts … Continue reading

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Nicolelis Lab Graduate Student to Lead Duke Graduate and Professional Student Council

Amol Yadav, a biomedical engineering PhD student in the Nicolelis Lab has been elected President of the Graduate and Professional Student Council (GPSC) at Duke University. Related Links: Amol Yadav to lead Duke Graduate and Professional Student Council New GPSC … Continue reading

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TOUCH AND MOVEMENT NEURONS SHAPE THE BRAIN’S INTERNAL IMAGE OF THE BODY

The brain representation of the body, called the body schema, is susceptible to plasticity. For instance, subjects experiencing a rubber hand illusion develop a sense of ownership of a mannequin hand when they view it being touched while tactile stimuli … Continue reading

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FIRST BRAIN-TO-BRAIN INTERFACE ALLOWS TRANSMISSION OF TACTILE AND MOTOR INFORMATION BETWEEN RATS

A brain-to-brain interface (BTBI) enabled a real-time transfer of behaviorally meaningful sensorimotor information between the brains of two rats. In this BTBI, an ‘‘encoder’’ rat performed sensorimotor tasks that required it to select from two choices of tactile or visual … Continue reading

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